Scenery Tumblr Themes

I'm Emma and I like lots of different things! So i discovered this thing called Tumblr and it has changed my life in so many ways. I would like to thank Mishelle for that. Tumblr is my place to vent and share my person problems. I love sharks, cats and everything else Tumblr has to offer. Please ask ANYTHING!! Questions, anon or not. :D I also run a blog on cats called felinefixation so if you love cats and kittens totally follow up on that blog. Thanks Bro.

It is so cold and I do not want to go to work

scienceisbeauty:

(Beautiful) internal structures of the aquatic animals. Top: tube-snout (Aulorhynchus flavidus).  Middle: butterfly ray (Gymnura crebripunctata). Bottom: scalyhead sculpin (Artedius harringtoni).

Credit: Adam Summers

Source: Amazing Pictures of See-Through Fish (National Geographic)

griseus:

Some sharks are harmless and really tender. This species is the redspotted cat shark (Schroederichthys chilensis) occurs in Humboldt current in Perú and Chile, and when feels threatened, it curls itself. really cute ne?

Secret Lives of Flower Hat Jellyfish Revealed

For decades, flower hat jellyfish managed to keep their early lives a secret.

In adulthood, the jellyfish are striking, with a nest of fluorescent tentacles that look like party streamers, but pack a nasty sting. In infancy, well, scientists didn’t know. Aquarists tried, unsuccessfully, to raise the animals in tanks to understand what happens before the jellyfish are fully grown.

"They just aren’t like other jellies," said Wyatt Patry, senior aquarist at the Monterey Bay Aquarium in California.

Now, Patry and colleagues report they’ve finally raised the jellyfish in captivity. In a new paper, the researchers describe the elusive species’ life cycle, from egg to larva to single-tentacled polyp to juvenile to adult.

Scientists at the aquarium first bought a group of flower hat jellies back from Japan in 2002 for an exhibit on jellyfish. At the time, aquarists tried to mate and culture the species (scientifically named Olindias formosus), but they just couldn’t seem to get the jellies to release any sperm or eggs.

Patry said the researchers tried performing in vitro fertilization and exposing the jellies to stresses that might make them release sex cells. The creatures produced some larvae, but they didn’t grow much larger than that stage. Ultimately, it seemed that the scientists were missing some cue the jellyfish needed for reproduction.

When it came time for another jellyfish show in 2012, the team tried again. They kept groups of flower hat jellies in small tanks with mesh netting to keep the creatures off the bottom, where detritus and rotting pieces of half-eaten fish settled. The scientists don’t exactly know what they did right the second time around, but during routine maintenance, they discovered fluorescent jellyfish polyps attached to the wire mesh and glowing under a blue light.

Jellyfish larvae attach themselves to a solid surface and become stalklike polyps, which then bud into juvenile “medusae” — what jellyfish are called when they reach their most recognizable, umbrella-shaped form. Jellyfish polyps persist for an unknown amount of time. The polyps of flower hat jellies were unusual in that they had a single, highly active tentacle.

"They just look like little sea anemones," Patry told Live Science. "They seem to use the tentacle to sweep around their position to capture food."

Patry hopes the new information might help scientists and wildlife managers look for the species in the wild — and predict when and where “blooms” of the jellyfish could affect beachgoers.

Flower hat jellies kill and eat entire fish, and their venom is powerful enough to inflict a painful rash on humans. The mark looks like a burn, said Patry. (Take it from him. He said he usually gets stung a couple of times a year.) A 2007 review of jellyfish incidents recorded around the world found one death associated with flower hat jellies, in Japan in the 1970s.

The findings on young flower hat jellies were published in June in the Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom.

OMG so interesting

smartereveryday:

How old do fish get?  Today’s Smarter Every Day Infrographic helps understand!

I feel like the turtle ones are wrong ish

smartereveryday:

How old do fish get?  Today’s Smarter Every Day Infrographic helps understand!

I feel like the turtle ones are wrong ish

waterbody:

red octopus. Princeton CA, June 2012 / FH20 /

waterbody:

red octopus. Princeton CA, June 2012 / FH20 /

huffingtonpost:

Underwater seals love a belly rub, yes they do. See the unbelievably cute video here.

gigimonsoon:

Real proof of mermaids wow!
Source-Hoaxslayer

gigimonsoon:

Real proof of mermaids wow!

Source-Hoaxslayer

staceythinx:

Sometimes scientists have to get creative to raise funding for their work. Squid scientists Andrea Suria and Sarah McAnulty have come up with some very creative ways to reward contributors on the Kickstarter-for-science site experiment.com. These include prints of their own artwork (pictured above) for donations of $100 or the ability to name one of the squids in their lab for the low price of $20. Check it out to see how you might be able to help them reach their goal and stick around to see if there might be some other scientists you can help support too.

aquaristlifeforme:

I LOVE THIS FISH! This is a starry blenny. He is super cute. And today some little girl was looking at him in his tank and said, “That fish is ugly, and he doesn’t even swim around. He is a stupid fish.” LITTLE GIRL I WILL END YOUR LIFE IF YOU EVER TALK ABOUT MY CUTE FISH LIKE THAT!! JUST LOOK AT HIM!!!

aquaristlifeforme:

I LOVE THIS FISH! This is a starry blenny. He is super cute. And today some little girl was looking at him in his tank and said, “That fish is ugly, and he doesn’t even swim around. He is a stupid fish.” LITTLE GIRL I WILL END YOUR LIFE IF YOU EVER TALK ABOUT MY CUTE FISH LIKE THAT!! JUST LOOK AT HIM!!!

waterbody:

Octopus rubescens. Moss Beach CA, Aug. 2014 / TS25 /

waterbody:

Octopus rubescens. Moss Beach CA, Aug. 2014 / TS25 /